Timber Madness at 1403 Eagle Way

If you’ve ever watched Barnwood Builders you get the drift; somebody acquires an ancient barn or log home, they deconstruct it, then re-construct it either into the same shape structure or a modified structure. But the point is to save a building that has been let go far too long. It’s actually a beautiful way to repurpose what might be a condemned structure. And that is the story of 1403 Eagle Way, listed by a colleague of mine at Summit Sotheby’s International Realty. You can view the virtual tour here, and as you’ll see in the drone shots at the beginning, the views are fantastic, and here is the full listing report.

The story continues: apparently the dramatic timbers repurposed here are from an Essex grain barn, built in the 17th Century.

And they are MAGNIFICENT.

1403Eagle-5

Now, you know how important good ceilings are to me. And this? Good ceiling. Very good ceiling.

1403Eagle-13

The timber and brick usage above the stove! Oh, my heart.

1403Eagle-9

This is the upstairs loft area, and it is a perfectly lovely place to write or knit or plan your next Game of Thrones-style betrayal.

1403Eagle-3

And everywhere in the home they have preserved the gorgeous joinery. In their time, these joints were built for function, and made to last for 400 years or more. What we might dismiss as only an aesthetic choice today was simply a beautiful and elegant solution to a problem back then.

1403Eagle-2

This is a special house.

1403Eagle-4

One that needs to be preserved, loved. Respected. This home needs a special owner. One that will appreciate the big details, like the massive timbers.

1403Eagle-6

And the little details, like the cast iron door pulls.

1403Eagle-8

And lovely latches.

Portions of the house aren’t timber-accented, including the downstairs level. However there is an interesting wood feature here: the floor of the bar. Look closely.

1403Eagle-11

Look MORE closely.

1403Eagle-12

It’s an end grain wood block floor! I can’t think of another house in Park City with this type of flooring. Also known here in the US as Nicolson pavement, its origins are unknown, but surely trace back hundreds and hundreds of years. Wood was easier to work with and easier to obtain than rock for a very long time, so it was quite popular as street pavement until less slippery, less creosote-soaked, more durable stone-based paving became more available. It was also used on interiors, even into the 1970s Chrysler used it on some of their factory floors because it was easy on the feet and the equipment, easy to repair, and because it was indoors, didn’t rot or need to be sealed as often. Plus it’s beautiful.

1403Eagle-10

This house is not gimmicky. But it is a home with impact. The location is good, the views are excellent, and the interior is lovely, memorable, and worth preserving.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s